Gay, Aspiring Pastor Pleads For Church To Accept Him In Impassioned Speech

Discussion in 'Race, Religion, Science and Politics' started by OckyDub, Feb 26, 2019.

  1. OckyDub

    OckyDub is a Verified MemberOckyDub I gave the Loc'ness monstah about $3.50
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    They don't like you, damn near hate you and you want them to accept you and make you a part of their cult. Have at it.



    As the United Methodist Church, America’s third-largest religious denomination, teetered on the edge of a schism this week over some members’ refusal to embrace queer Christians, one young gay college student stepped up to plead for his future in the church.

    Jeffrey “J.J.” Warren, a United Methodist from New York, approached a microphone inside the vast St. Louis, Missouri, auditorium on Monday, where a conference convened to determine the UMC’s position on queer relationships is taking place.

    The delegates had just voted against considering a plan that allowed regional bodies in the UMC to independently decide whether to conduct same-sex marriages and ordain gay clergy. The proposal would have also removed language from the church’s rulebook that states that “the practice of homosexuality is incompatible with Christian teaching.”

    Instead, a majority of delegates (56 percent) affirmed a plan that would have enforced bans against queer weddings and queer clergy more strictly. It was a preliminary vote ahead of a final decision expected on Tuesday.

    Warren, a lay delegate to the meeting, spoke to his more than 800 fellow delegates about his love for the UMC, the church in which he was raised. He spoke about evangelizing to fellow LGBTQ college students at Sarah Lawrence College, pointing out that “they didn’t know God could love them because their churches said God didn’t.”

    He spoke about his call to ministry and his dream of one day becoming a pastor in the UMC. And he passionately pleaded for his church to stay united, despite threats of an impending rift over LGBTQ acceptance.

    “No plan to separate us can unite us like God’s love,” Warren said during the fiery speech, as some of his listeners began to roar their approval from the stands. “We are the church. We are God’s children. Let us be the church together.”

    Warren received a long, boisterous, standing ovation. Some attendees began singing the children’s song, “Jesus Loves Me,” from the stands.

    On Twitter, progressive United Methodists and other progressive Christians immediately began tweeting about Warren’s speech.
     
  2. OckyDub

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    United Methodist Church strengthens ban on same-sex marriage, LGBT clergy

    The United Methodist Church voted on Tuesday to uphold and strengthen its ban on same-sex marriage and LGBT clergy in a move likely to alienate large numbers of followers who had pushed for reform.

    By a vote of 438-384, delegates from around the world attending the church’s General Conference in St. Louis reinforced a United Methodist Church policy established in 1972 stating that “the practice of homosexuality is incompatible with Christian teaching.”

    Known as the Traditional Plan, the new policy includes penalties for breaking its rules and asks those who will not obey it to find another church.

    The Traditional Plan is designed to serve as a coherent United Methodist Church policy on LGBT clergy and their marriage practices after years of inconsistency among individual United Methodist churches, with some churches denouncing homosexuality as a sin and others embracing gay and lesbian clergy members.

    Before opting for the Traditional Plan, delegates rejected an alternative known as the One Church Plan, which would have allowed individual churches to decide whether to perform same-sex marriages and welcome gay and lesbian clergy members. Under that plan, the statement that homosexuality is at odds with Christianity would have been eliminated.

    The vote roiled many in America’s second-largest Protestant denomination. Tom Berlin, a delegate, told Reuters that some supporters of the One Church Plan held small protest demonstrations afterward.

    “This is devastating,” Lucy Berrier said on Twitter. “Above all, the United Methodist Church is supposed to be a place of grace and service, not this bigotry and hate. My heart is broken into a thousand pieces.”

    Berlin, who is a pastor in the Washington suburb of Herndon, Virginia, said with the new plan in place, some church members would risk losing their credentials to practice their belief in LGBT rights.

    “Some churches will begin to do what they desire. They will test this new legislation by performing marriages and some conferences will ordain gay clergy,” he said in an interview after the final vote.

    At least 12 million people, including 7 million in the United States, belong to the United Methodist Church. A 2014 Pew survey found that 60 percent of U.S. Methodists said homosexuality should be accepted by society. About half of U.S. Methodists said they supported same-sex marriage.

    The rift in opinion over gay marriage and clergy members’ sexual orientation is along geographic as well as ideological lines.

    Supporters of the Traditional Plan include many African and Philippine members as well as evangelical members from Europe and the United States. The One Church Plan derived most of its support from members in the United States who have witnessed a wave of social change regarding LGBT rights and awareness.

    The U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage in all 50 states in 2015. But the law does not apply to religious institutions.


    The Southern Baptist Convention, the largest Protestant denomination in the United States, remains strongly opposed to same-sex marriage. But a growing number of U.S. Protestant denominations allow gay marriage and clergy, including the Episcopal Church, the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.


    Reporting by Katharine Jackson in Washington; Editing by Bill Tarrant and Peter Cooney
     
  3. mojoreece

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    At this point in time there already churches and denomination that are progressive and accept LGBT folk. They should just leave and join the Unitarians, United Church of Christ or start their own church(s).
     
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  4. Lancer

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    Speaking of which, not religious myself, but I always gave UCC props for this commercial from Obama era
     
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