Black Gay Privilege Does Exist

By OckyDub | Posted Apr 20 2015 | 70 Comments  

BG Privilege

The new controversial buzz phrase that’s making its way through the internet and gay-o-sphere is Black Gay Privilege. Yep, you read it right, Black Gay Privilege. Back in 2012 David Pedulla released The Positive Consequences of Negative Stereotypes: Race, Sexual Orientation and the Job Application Process in Social Psychology Quarterly.

Princeton University News gives a summary of Pedulla’s findings:

The result was that each participant suggested a starting salary for an applicant portrayed as a straight white man, a gay white man, a gay black man or a straight black man. Participants were also asked questions about the applicant that Pedulla used to measure how “threatening” they perceived the applicant to be.

The survey participants recommended lower starting salaries for straight black men and gay white men than for straight white men, indicating a salary penalty for being black or for being gay, Pedulla said.

“However, there is no salary penalty for gay black men, who receive higher salary recommendations than straight black men and salary recommendations on par with straight white men,” Pedulla said. “There is some evidence that gay black men are perceived as less threatening than straight black men and that this difference accounts for a piece of the salary recommendation difference between these two groups.

Fast forward to 2014/2015 and we’re now discussing Black Gay Privilege.

John Fitzgerald Gates writes a piece titled Unmasking Black Gay Privilege where he elaborates on the concept. Subsequently Tabias Wilson writes a counter piece The Truth About Black Gay Privilege where he expounds as to why Black Gay Privilege is a myth. Even though Wilson’s essay has some valid points, it’s hard to stomach the abundance of overly used LGBT mainstream buzz words of queer, cis and one I had never heard of BlaQueer…seriously?

Gates mentions how he has benefitted from BGP (Black Gay Privilege) throughout his career and states he accessed spaces and opportunities that “stereotypical” black men were not able to. Wilson’s stance seems to be based on his experience with a white female boss, which in my view is a poor counter. Just because you haven’t personally experienced something, that shouldn’t mean the thing you haven’t experienced doesn’t exist.

In Pedulla’s survey and in both essays there is an elephant in the room that seems to be danced around or not being fully factored within this issue. Black gay males are being painting with a single brush as if they are one monochromatic group. Agree or disagree, that elephant that is danced around when attempting to discuss BGP is the differences between masculine and feminine black homosexual men.

Gates subtly mentions this by saying “The literature shows that the masculinity of black gay men is often feminized in popular culture, thereby reducing the impact of traditional black male stereotypes and serving as a counter, sometimes beneficial, stereotype. As mentioned previously, Gates states he “accessed spaces and opportunities that stereotypical black men were not able to.” Reading between the lines, “stereotypical” in this context means masculine.

Again Wilson attempts to counter by saying as a feminine leaning black gay man (the flow of my queerness, somewhere left of masculine – his words) BGP can’t exist because of a white, out-of-touch, possible racist or just overly insensitive female boss grinded his gears.

Wilson goes on to state “Neither queerness nor same-sex attraction inherently require or guarantee a particular performance of masculinities or femininities.” True but that doesn’t negate the fact that homosexual men of color are not all feminine.

Let’s be honest here, effeminate homo or hetero men are perceived weaker as and thus less threating than masculine homo or hetero men.

As a masculine leaning black homosexual man, you don’t know of my sexuality unless it’s disclosed. I am by many in corporate and white societal and cultural definitions threatening or intimidating. I know this as fact due to being numerously told so directly within corporate America. Nonetheless by sexual classification, those on the outside looking in – heterosexuals and white homosexuals – I could possibly or do benefit from Black Gay Privilege, which is the furthest from the truth. I mean can’t you just foresee Fox News or Drudge jumping all over this and shaping it for their narrative as a new and improved form of Affirmative Action keeping the white man down?

Supremacy, racism, biases, bigotry and oppression continues to be dominate forces in societies. In many facets, they trump all and dictate how we maneuver in and out of our communities. Both essays do speak upon racial and discriminatory hiring practices and working conditions in some details. As stated previously both make very valid points and outwardly gay men absolutely suffer discrimination and violence from those who are anti-gay. Nevertheless, if we stick to the topic, do some black gay men have an advantage when it comes to hiring practices not only based on their qualifications but also due to their less threating effeminate demeanor? I feel the answer is yes.

The new buzz phrase that is Black Gay Privilege is incorrect. If this is going to be added and overused within the LGBT lexicon at least use it correctly and accurately as Feminine Black Gay Privilege.

 

About the Author
OckyDub

Octavius is a founder and editor of Cypher Avenue. He's here to help speak for us and show the world that masculine gay / bisexual men of color are not a part of the stereotypical gay normal that is seen and fed to the masses. No...we are a distinct breed, filled with character and pride. Cypher Avenue is here to show the world how we are different.

   
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70 Comments Feel Free To Join The Cypher.

  1. hannibal
    Hannibal | April 20th, 2015
    0

    As I said earlier, in som sectors it is a bonus to be black and gay. I work in entertainment and I didn’t start getting any projects off the ground until I came out.

    • Nick Delmacy | April 20th, 2015
      +1

      To be clear, you work behind the scenes at a black-female-centric web series network…If you were Out as a black gay actor or singer wanting to work in non-gay or non-black entertainment realm…this statement might be different…

      • hannibal
        Hannibal | April 20th, 2015
        0

        I was also at a talent agency in NY for 7 years before I headed out to LA and as soon as I came out I got a raise and a promotion and generally treated better by my colleagues.

        • Nick Delmacy | April 20th, 2015
          +1

          That’s great. But my point still stands. You came out in a work environment that leaned heavily towards catering to black women. Many black gay men in the entertainment industry can’t say they have benefited from coming out. Especially if they are masculine or not into gay culture/slang. (eg: Michael Sam)

        • Nick Delmacy | April 20th, 2015
          +1

          Wait…you got a raise and a promotion JUST from coming out as gay? Not because you proved to be an asset through your works?

          • ControlledXaos | April 20th, 2015
            +2

            Ok? I’m like maybe I need to come to work with a rainbow flag tie on or a Express Men cut v neck, clip on earrings and heels because I needs a raise.

            • alton
              NYCforEVER | April 21st, 2015
              0

              LMAO! This reminds me of that soundbite they used to do on the “Wendy Williams Experience” with the (I’m assuming) Sylvester Disco song, and that “I…I…I…I’M GAY, Im a HOMO, I like GUYS” and the “h-h-h-HUH you DUUUH’N” LOL!!!!

              • ControlledXaos | April 22nd, 2015
                0

                See…lol

          • hannibal
            Hannibal | April 20th, 2015
            0

            The point that I was making was that as soon as I came out the way the environment treated me was much different. And as far as masculine gay men not being treated well….I”M TELLING YOU THEY DO NOT COME OUT! I knew several of my African American clients that were on the low and some of them even ran from me when I would see them out. And people aren’t stupid, they be knowing you is a gay and that breeds mistrust in an industry build on the façade of trust. Look at Jussie Smollett…he has an HRC logo tatted on him…and still won’t just come out and say he a gay.

            • Nick Delmacy | April 20th, 2015
              +1

              Jussie won’t come out for exactly the reasons I stated. It won’t benefit him as an actor the same way it benefited you as an independent filmmaker. There are many examples of this. No disrespect to your success but Jussie is working on a higher stage/platform. We live in a country where states are passing laws against gays. Don’t think that just because you and Lee Daniels are winning a lil bit, homophobia and discrimination has vanished.

              • hannibal
                Hannibal | April 20th, 2015
                0

                I call total BS. There’s several high powered white gay actors/actresses that have come out and are still high profile. Jussie has no excuse seeing as how playing gay roles put him on in the first place.

                • Nick Delmacy | April 20th, 2015
                  +3

                  But we’re talking about Black Gay Men….Not White Gays…Just because Jussie is light skinned doesn’t make him on the same playing field as Neil Patrick Harris and Zachary Quinto….

                • hannibal
                  Hannibal | April 20th, 2015
                  0

                  *deep sigh and eye roll* Ok.

                • ControlledXaos | April 20th, 2015
                  +2

                  He still black.

                  And culturally, people still would accept a white gay man over a black one.

                  Hell black folks stay playing Sam Smith songs on urban contemporary radio. I seriously doubt they would not be going ape shit crazy over the black gay man singing Lay Me Down with John Legend.

                • hannibal
                  Hannibal | April 20th, 2015
                  +1

                  His name is Frank Ocean…and he won Grammies.

                • Cyrus-Brooks
                  Cyrus Brooks | April 25th, 2015
                  0

                  Black entertainers are held to a different standard than white ones. Look at the negative feedback Tyler James Williams got from the black community just for playing a gay character in “Dear White People”. As far as I know he’s not even gay in RL he just played a gay character.

                • John | April 26th, 2015
                  0

                  For someone who works in the industry, there you go with your projections and lack of cognitive thinking skills.

                  Why I should be the one to tell but Simon Halls-Matt Bomer’s husband-looks after every successful out gay actor in Hollywood, from Jessie Tyler Ferguson to NPH.

                  Here’s a bit more for you, connect the dots and follow the money; each shows or productions these guys are on, re working with Ryan Murphy or HBO, is lead/supported by gay men who are part of this gay Hollywood clique.

                  Connect the dots…connect the dots…..

            • ControlledXaos | April 20th, 2015
              +5

              In that industry, entertainment, I can see it being relevant but at the same time, from the outside, it seems like “image is everything” is in not? So if Quita is supposed to view the leading man as Sexy, masculine, and available, but he’s doing 8 counts on Saturday night, how is it supposed to work if he wants a leading role in a hetero project?

              As for us low level common folks with boring white collar jobs, I’m still not convinced it is really relevant for everyone to know you like the same gender. I don’t mind people knowing. I just don’t see what the point is? I’m not social at work anyway. I don’t want to go to gym with you, be invited to your wedding etc, look at photos of your ugly ass kids… It’s a job. I’m not here to make friends. Be happy I sign the birthday card or chipped in on the wedding gift card but the rest of that ish… I don’t see it.

              • Rhode | April 20th, 2015
                +2

                That was quite brutal, but quite true…

              • alton
                NYCforEVER | April 21st, 2015
                +3

                “…ugly ass kids” LMAO LMAO!!! Dude, don’t you hate the BDay Card, Anniversary Card, Baby Shower card, BS. They just passed around here yesterday, some retirement book (not card…BOOK) for this Evil ass, Stony skinned, Hag that works in our finance dept for everybody to sign. Fuk outta here. Evil ass. Been workin’ up in this bitch since the turn of the 19th century.

                • Confusing One | April 21st, 2015
                  0

                  Sometimes I found a way to get around signing those cards. Like going for a like going for a walking lunch break. lol

                • ControlledXaos | April 22nd, 2015
                  0

                  Turn of the 19th century…. Deadt. Lol

    • ControlledXaos | April 20th, 2015
      +1

      Frank who now? I’ll conceed that some of his thunder was stolen from Jussie (by happenstance) but Lauryn Hill taught that us you can not sit on big black for too long before you basically be described as “fallen off”.

  2. hannibal
    Hannibal | April 20th, 2015
    0

    Michael Sam*rolling eyes*, Jason Collins, Frank Ocean….last I checked they had no careers before coming out. So what are ya’ll talking about?

    • Nick Delmacy | April 20th, 2015
      +4

      Michael Sam before coming out: Named SEC Defensive Player of the Year in the toughest division, promising NFL career prospects…Michael Sam after coming out: Ridiculed and disrespected by media, Fired from 2 NFL teams before even getting a chance to play in a single regular season game….Jason Collins Before coming out: 12 seasons in the NBA…Jason Collins after coming out: Struggle to sign with a team, eventually forced to retire. Frank Ocean before coming out, loved by black radio, million + twitter followers and cameos on fellow black artist’s songs…Frank Ocean after coming out: Forced to deactivate his twitter account, Vanishes from public sight and no longer asked to cameo on fellow black artist’s songs.

    • thatGuy | April 21st, 2015
      0

      @Hannibal, I was thinking the same thing. I was like alright this gay political s#*% is all over the place. I need a Gay Politics 101 class…lol

    • John | April 26th, 2015
      0

      What are u smoking? Have u even bothered to read ANY interviews that they have done? Man, people like you who are always projecting and bitching about people but u don’t even give them the respect to follow them or even read any interviews they have done.

      Frank Ocean is the only one who still has a career he is happy with but he had to move to London and settle down w his chilled out low-key photographer hipster boyfriend to achieve that.

  3. BlackguyExecutive | April 20th, 2015
    +2

    I think the entire argument here is rooted in deeply flawed logic and extremely poor scholarship. After reading this article this morning I actually downloaded and read the “study” from the Journal Article. What is troubling is that the many of the cited sources in the study are decades old. Its really hard to measure current stereotypes when the sources cited wrote about stereotypes in the late 70’s and 80’s which are arguably different times….this is just weak scholarship and click-bait internet CRAP!!

    • Ocky Williams | April 20th, 2015
      0

      I disagree only upon the ‘click bait’ point. All this info came out in 2012 but it didn’t gain some traction until 2014/2015. Privileges exist in our society and they should be brought to the table and discussed. I don’t feel this is a widespread phenomenon but I feel it does happen.

    • Cyrus-Brooks
      Cyrus Brooks | April 20th, 2015
      0

      Exactly this ridiculous article starts with faulty premise all black gay men a effeminate and thus(non threatening) and that all black gay men are affluent or come from affluent backgrounds with access to exclusive upper middle-class education and job opportunities.

      • Ocky Williams | April 20th, 2015
        0

        So do you agree or disagree that feminine leaning black gay men are less threatening?

        • Cyrus-Brooks
          Cyrus Brooks | April 20th, 2015
          +1

          No I don’t agree with that idea. That is simply what was implied by the author. Being effeminate limits the kind of carrier fields one can participate in without any negative feedback from coworkers or employers. Having worked in a few male dominated carrier fields gay men in general, especially effeminate gay men are looked at very negatively.

        • BlackguyExecutive | April 21st, 2015
          +2

          I think that is completely subjective. You guys posted a story about that gay gang in….I would suggest that those fem men are more threatening then me in many respect and would be perceived as more threatening. I think the by simply having black skin you can be perceived as threatening regardless of situation or circumstance. Me in a suit or my normal attire vs those fem homo thugs…??

          • Ocky Williams | April 21st, 2015
            +3

            Again disagree…why add more topics/subjects to the conversation when the topic at hand is already present? We are not talking about a gay gang.

            This subject has to do with hiring/salary practices as it pertains to black gay men. There is clear reason why effeminate gay men dominate the landscape in media which was touched upon in Gates’ essay. Its not only because they are Out but its also because they are less threatening, familiar and usually are in weaker or submissive role. In real life, women are comfortable around fem gay men because they are less threatening and dont want to have sex with them and on some levels relatable. Straight men do not perceive fem gays as a threat to possibly take their woman/women.

            Yes many none-blacks can and do perceive black men as threatening however that doesn’t mean they don’t or cant perceive fem black gay men as LESS threatening.

            That is the point that is being missed…Less threatening doesn’t mean non-threatening.

            Why all of a sudden for this topic Fem black gay men are just as dangerous and threatening as ISIS?

            • ControlledXaos | April 22nd, 2015
              0

              This.

              I have a FB friend who is black and gay. He’s an introvert in IT.

              For the past two holiday seasons he’s complained about having to work on Christmas and Thanksgiving. I think they see him as a push over and play the “oh he doesn’t have kids so the holidays are not important to him as it is to me” card. I told him that no one told these folks to have kids and he should not have to work when he wants the time off too but apparently complaining about it on social media is where his Keyboard Courage rises.

              There’s many situations where certain attributes of our personality can be seen as a threat or not depending on the environment.

  4. Ocky Williams | April 20th, 2015
    0

    The closing paragraphs from the Princeton University News article had me doing a side eye…

    “Along with exploring what other stereotypes might interact in unexpected ways, Pedulla said, “I would be interested in conducting an experimental audit study of real job openings in the labor market where the race and sexual orientation of the job applicants were experimentally manipulated.”

    The fake position or job opening used in the survey was in retail which is not on the same caliber as jobs in corporate America where office politics run rampant while attempting to climb the corporate ladder.

    My response is more geared towards various internet/social media commentaries and the two essays that were written about the subject by two black gay men.

  5. Cyrus-Brooks
    Cyrus Brooks | April 20th, 2015
    +2

    There is no such thing as “black gay privilege.” This so-called phenomenon only exists in the minds of paranoid homophobic heterosexual black men and bitter resentful white gays. Black gay men have to deal with double whammy of being black men and being gay both of which are a major disadvantage in American society.

  6. Rhode | April 20th, 2015
    0

    To the highly esteemed and most exalted masculine gay brothers out here, you are the Unsung Heroes of the gay world. You play by the rules, your discretion and your blend into everyday society makes you true champions of your environment. Your masculinity shields and insulates you from the harsher perceptions of society. That is comforting and secure for you. On the other hand, this article stating that Out Black gay men tend to make more money than straight black men, is interesting… It also seems to show one cannot always have it both ways. Take wing! You fly below the radar and your bubble is intact and safe from this cruel world that a lot of Out brothers deal with daily. You are truly the Champions…

    • Ocky Williams | April 20th, 2015
      +3

      Dear Masculine Gay Men…ANY type of trauma or torment that you have suffered in your lifetime concerning your sexuality; please know it was all a figment of your imagination.

      • hannibal
        Hannibal | April 22nd, 2015
        +1

        I’m glad you know.

    • John | April 26th, 2015
      -1

      Someone has a chip on their shoulder….uh oh…the oppression olympics!!!

      • RHODE | April 27th, 2015
        0

        Awww, was it something I said?

  7. Confusing One | April 20th, 2015
    +1

    So many thoughts. First the paper by that dude Tabias Wilson- The Truth about Black Gay Privilege , was a whole lot of BS. He complained about his white female boss touching his hips and body, running her fingers through his hair because he we was? That is sexual harassment. You are human first, man second, black next, and gay last (if that is even relevant at work). He then went on to say he eventually confronted her and she became fearful of him. If you tell someone to “stop sexually harassing me” that should bring fear but I guaranteed he let it go on for sometime so she was probably thinking why is it suddenly a problem.

    And why and how did she and other coworkers become comfortable talking about Beyonce and other typical gay stuff at work? Work is work. Be a professional first and also recognize the chain of command. There needs to be a higher level of professionalism with those above you.

    Continuing on the lines of professionalism and masculinity, the two editors of this website and other commentators on the site I spoke about men who appear to meet the “typical/stereotypical” standards of a masculine men but after a few alcoholic drinks or being around other fem leaning gay men or women, they began to feminine or start expressing the gay lingo. This is indeed true, but I find it hard to believe that masculine men (natural or acting) would let the guard down at work or better yet in the interview to even get hired.

    Also less threatening is still threatening. Shoot, I sometimes get scared of angry feminine gay men. That could be my own issues though.

    Finally, the reality is even if you are naturally masculine and people THINK you are gay or get down with dudes there is discrimination. I know alot of us take pride in being or thinking that we are unclockable, but the reality is if you are a man, private about your personal (weekend life), and haven’t produced a son or daughter, over 28+ people will suspect. There will still be hesitations on giving you that raise, promotion, or job. Trust. There is no black gay privilege in the workplace.

  8. RolandG
    Rolandgarros28 | April 20th, 2015
    +1

    At my company, I work with one very out and proud white lesbian, one out and proud latino gay man and one other black gay man who is out and sorta effeminate. Guess which one gets treated the worst. The black gay man. I feel bad because several people in my office know about me and I don’t really have an issue. When the guys want to go out and play golf or whatever, I always get invited by not the other black gay guy. I feel bad for him. His effeminacy isn’t making him less threatening to the straight men in my office. I’m not sure if they are embarrassed to be seen with him or whatever but he definitely gets left out a lot. Interesting enough, he’s close with the white lesbian and the vast majority of the women in the office and in leadership. So from my limited experience, effeminate gay men are ostracized much more in corporate america. I think corporate boards can deal with a masculine gay man period representing the company over an effeminate gay man any day. Unless, like @nick said, the effeminate gay man works in an industry like fashion that caters to gay men more

    • John | April 26th, 2015
      0

      It’s all so relative. In that instance because there are a few of you, this would happen and also like you said, in a male corporate environment but it’s a chicken and egg situ-was drifting towards the women or did he drift towards them because the men don’t invite him to golf?

      People can read/smell things in others and many times it is NOT personal, they just assume he’d rather hang around with women and would not be interested in stuff like golf.

      You get what you put out and a lot of black folk straight or gay don’t seem to get this.

      Work is work, just like school it’s a jungle u must navigate smartly. So many black folk want people to work around THEM and you know what? People are tired and trying to make a living.

      I bet they also feel he may be too sensitive to comments etc.

  9. BlackguyExecutive | April 21st, 2015
    +1

    I also think that it is a false premise to suggest that money equals privilege. There are plenty of black people who make money but are still perceived as threatening. I get that feminine men are perceived as non-threatening in the work place but I don’t think there is any evidence that this premise is actually true or rooted in empirical evidence.

    • Ocky Williams | April 21st, 2015
      0

      Just curious…so you saying BET Founder Robert Johnson or American Express CEO Kenneth I. Chenault doesn’t have more privilege then you?

      • BlackguyExecutive | April 21st, 2015
        0

        No. I am not saying that. I am sure they have more privileged given their access to resources..what I am saying is that a lot of times money doesn’t play a factor…let take professional athletes or actors, look at Chris Rock..the CEO’s you cited are not protected by their wealth but their wealth affords them greater access to resources…like Legal Counsel for example,

        • BlackguyExecutive | April 21st, 2015
          0

          Do you think any of those men could use the Afluenza defense?

  10. BlackUrbanite | April 21st, 2015
    0

    I agree and disagree … I don’t think it’s absolutely black and white. It really depends on the situation and the person. I’ve seen instances where BGP helped and hurt (myself included).

  11. Malik | April 22nd, 2015
    +1

    I don’t think it’s necessarily that effeminate, black, gay men are less threatening that’s getting them success in the office. In my experience, effeminate gay men are more likely to show a certain perkiness, often seen in young women, that can be very endearing. You’re not going to see that perkiness in a more masculine guy. Also, I often find more effeminate men to be better spoken and more charismatic, which ties into the perkiness. Effeminate gay men of any race can seem more friendly, which, yes, I guess you could say is them being less threatening, but isn’t that what you want in the office environment? This article makes it seem like offices have something against masculinity, when in reality, who doesn’t want to work with someone that’s perky and friendly? But, to add to that, a lot of offices feel pressured to hire minorities, much like colleges, and if an office feels like the straight and masculine gay black applicants they get are more threatening or whatever, why wouldn’t they go for a black man that is less threatening? This isn’t privilege. It’s just offices exercising a reasonable basis on which to hire someone that they’re going to have to deal with for quite some time. How can you be mad at that, or even more, mad at effeminate, gay, black men for that?

  12. LouDiggz | April 22nd, 2015
    +2

    I do think that gay privilege exist, but only in certain circumstances. But here’s the thing….black men are way too aggressively masculine. Black men often go out of their way to be intimidating, like smiling or being regular is a crime. However, I do believe that white America prefers an overtly effeminate black man as opposed to a masculine one or an “in between” like myself. Black men do need to tone that sh*t down sometimes.

    • Confusing One | April 23rd, 2015
      +1

      “But here’s the thing….black men are way too aggressively masculine. Black men often go out of their way to be intimidating, like smiling or being regular is a crime.”

      @LouDiggz I am glad you mentioned this. I wouldn’t generalize and say all black men or even the majority, but definitely too many “masculine” brothers do that. And many are not intentionally intimidating per se but just seem non-approachable and not even from a relationship/sexual perspective. For some of those dudes it is fake masculinity.

      Funny how there are so many definitions of masculinity and for so many it is subjective.

      • ControlledXaos | April 24th, 2015
        +1

        Ok so… can someone explain to me why some gay men get upset about hyper-masculinity but then turn right back around and want to have relationships with these types?

        I think that a lot of times, it’s not even ‘hyper masculine’ it’s just that A is more masculine than B and B perceives it as “hyper” for whatever reason.

        • Confusing One | April 25th, 2015
          +2

          Not sure if you replying to me or LouDiggz, but what you said is true. Sometimes dude A is more masculine then B so dude B gets the “hypermasculine” tag.

          But I still hold the thought that some dudes sometimes equating being hard to talk or being stand offish with being masculine. Not the same thing to ME.

        • Cyrus-Brooks
          Cyrus Brooks | April 25th, 2015
          +1

          I’ve noticed many effeminate or softer gay men will accuse even regularly masculine men especially if they are gay of being “hyper masculine”. To me that term is meaningless because the way it is used by many gays is like a kind of insult. That said you do have a point these soft guys will knock each other over to chase after “trade” or “straight” men. This is one of the reasons I find it hard to take dudes like this seriously.

    • Cyrus-Brooks
      Cyrus Brooks | April 24th, 2015
      0

      “black men are way too aggressively masculine. Black men often go out of their way to be intimidating” I have to call bullshit on your entire comment. Last time I checked it’s white men who are overwhelmingly aggressive. Most of the violence committed in the world is the direct result of white aggression and greed against nonwhites. If black men are aggressive is because we’ve been systematically been rendered powerless in American society so it’s understandable that black respond by returning the aggression heaped on us. Why should black men have to kowtow to whites by being “less masculine”. I don’t hear anyone telling white men to be less masculine. Black men shouldn’t tone shit down. We should be splitting their heads open as payback for what they’ve been doing to us for 5 centuries.

      • alton
        NYCforEVER | April 24th, 2015
        +2

        I think the issue is that this “aggression” is not always directed at white people. We act like asses to each other more so than anyone else.

        • Confusing One | April 24th, 2015
          0

          Yup!

        • Cyrus-Brooks
          Cyrus Brooks | April 25th, 2015
          +1

          You make an excellent point most black aggression is directed at other blacks. Even now you’ll see even the most aggressive black people become very meek and docile in the presence of whites. It’s an extension of slave mentality many black Americans haven’t gotten over.

          • John | April 26th, 2015
            0

            Please. Get over yourself and travel around Africa. Has NOTHING to do w the so called white man.

  13. hannibal
    Hannibal | April 22nd, 2015
    0

    Has anyone mentioned that more fem leaning black gay men tend to be smarter and more creative thus leading to more success? No? ok.

    • ControlledXaos | April 22nd, 2015
      +3

      I work in Information Technology. Please gwown somewhea wit dat.

      • hannibal
        Hannibal | April 22nd, 2015
        0

        *doesn’t care where Controlled Chaos works and I’m still not convinced he’s a gay*

    • Ocky Williams | April 22nd, 2015
      +2

      But you still want that “trade” though.

      • hannibal
        Hannibal | April 22nd, 2015
        0

        I don’t still want trade. I found my favorite trade and he’s good enough. His name is @Ocky

    • Cyrus-Brooks
      Cyrus Brooks | April 25th, 2015
      +2

      More creative maybe, that’s what the stereotype would lead us to believe. Smarter I doubt it. I don’t think there is any good evidence on this only myths and anecdotes. That’s like saying heterosexual white men are the smartest because they tend dominate STEM field. There are lots of cultural and economic reasons why they are at the top of the heap in many fields.

      • pensive | April 25th, 2015
        0

        I’m glad you made this point. The “Outliers” explains that in depth.

  14. Pensive | April 24th, 2015
    0

    Flight attendants, bank customer service reps,nurses, to the front please.




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